Petrel Named Georgia National Guard Non-Commissioned Officer of the Year

Eric Hunt 3

State Command Sergeant Major Stringfield, Oglethorpe junior Staff Sgt. Eric Hunt, and State Commanding General Jarrard.

The Army National Guardsmen annually holds a Non-Commissioned Officer competition that is comprised of multiple levels of various grueling tasks, both physical and mental.  This year, Oglethorpe junior and Stone Mountain, Ga. native Staff Sgt. Eric N. Hunt ’16, an infantryman with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 121st Infantry Regiment, 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, won the competition and was named Georgia National Guard Non-Commissioned Officer of the Year. Eric, an international studies major, has spent approximately five years in the Army and three years in the National Guard.

In order to compete for the NCO recipient for the state level, Eric endured several levels of competition. The first level is the Battalion, which is held for one day in January. Competitors who are successful in the first level move on to the Brigade level, which occurs for three days in February. Finally, the state NCO candidates are put through a four-day competition in March.

Competitors are put through multiple types of physical and mental tests. First, is the fitness test, which includes push-ups, sit-ups and a two-mile run. An exam with general military topics and a graded essay is then administered. Weapons qualification follows, along with an obstacle course, and an interview with the merit board. The final task includes demonstrating general army skills, with no rest in-between.

Eric Hunt 4Eric says he preferred the shooting, weapons maintenance, and land navigation aspects of the competition. However, thanks to his Oglethorpe education, he felt he was best prepared for the essay and interview.

Eric advises other students to make time to work toward your goals. “There is a lot that can get done if you make time for things,” he says. “If there is something you want, go for it.”

New Oglethorpe Journal of Undergraduate Research Showcases Students’ Work

Like most college seniors—whether they’re budding writers, scientists, researchers, economists, artists, etc.—I want people to read and see my work, to ask questions, to challenge it. In other words, I want to be published. Thanks to Oglethorpe, I now have that chance.

The new Oglethorpe Journal of Undergraduate Research is a scholarly, peer-reviewed publication that promotes undergraduate research by preserving and making available the academic and creative inventions from our campus. The Journal serves as both a digital repository of scholarly output and a platform for publishing inventive and original works. Various types of submissions are accepted, including research articles, photography, book reviews, conference posters and more.

“It is one of the most rewarding and fulfilling things I’ve done since starting at Oglethorpe,” said Ashley N. Dawson ’16, one of the first students to be published. “I’ve wanted to be a published author since I was a little girl, and the Journal and its supporters made that dream a reality. It truly is an amazing feeling to see your thoughts on the screen, and to know that people are reading them and sharing them with others.”

The Journal was started thanks to the efforts of Anne Salter, university librarian and director of Philip Weltner Library, and Laura Masce, university archivist. While attending a conference at Kennesaw State University, they learned about the idea and the possibility of partnering with the institution. Kennesaw would host the site, and Oglethorpe students would be able to send submissions to their own, separate journal for their alma mater.

“We began getting the faculty on board…and there was a lot of interest,” said Anne. “We were determined to do this.”

Being published is incredibly helpful for a resume, and the process for publication is simple: write your thesis, talk to your advisor, and then submit!  A team of editors review the work and inform those who submit of any changes or problems before the work is published. The editors are David Evans, dean and assistant vice-president of library services at Kennesaw, and Oglethorpe faculty: Dr. Charles Baube, professor of biology; Dr. Michael Rulison, professor of physics; and Dr. Linda Taylor, professor of English.

Five freshman honors students, Derek C. Wolter ’16, Ashley N. Dawson ’16, Tali M. Schroeder ’16, Tabitha Clark ’16 and Grace B. Djokoto ’16, have already taken advantage of this opportunity, and the Journal is continuing to take submissions on a rolling basis.

“My article is about Inuit mythology and its influence in a children’s film,” said Tali. “Ms. Salter makes the publishing process very easy, and I would definitely recommend it to those who are unsure of submitting an article.”

“If you are seriously considering graduate school and doing original research,” added Anne, “coming to [Oglethorpe] is a great place to begin that research.”

Attention Oglethorpe students!  Why not take advantage of this opportunity? There are many ways to learn more: contact Anne Salter, visit the Journal’s website, or you can even watch Weston Manders’ “This Week in Oglethorpe Arts” video episode that features interviews about the new Journal.

A Petrel Lands with the Atlanta Hawks

Sporting the red & black: Arthur Hamilton '11 was an official member of the press during last week's game against the Detroit Pistons. The Hawks won 104-96. Photo: Rachael Alston, GSU '11

Last week’s Atlanta Hawks game against the Detroit Pistons was especially exciting for Oglethorpe senior Arthur Hamilton. Though an admitted Hawks fan, Hamilton was actually there covering the game on assignment.  He was chosen by the Hawks to experience the NBA game as a professional journalist—interacting with Hawks staff members, sportswriters and broadcasters along the way. 

Did you know? In 1979, the Atlanta Hawks held open practice in the Oglethorpe University Field House.

“Overall it was a great experience,” said Arthur, a former basketball player himself. “I got to see all of the backstage media guides and production.  My favorite part of the whole day was…during the postgame press conference.  We got to have a 15-20 minute Q&A interview session with [Hawks Coach] Larry Drew.”

The communication and project management major currently interns at Turner Sport’s NBA TV, and hopes to work with them and NCAA.com after graduation. With five sports-related internships under his belt, Arthur felt comfortable working in the Philips Arena press box. 

“It was good to see a new perspective and experience the media questions and backstage production,” said Arthur.  “Everything I learned through my experience on Sunday furthers my desire to [seize] opportunities in my career path.  I hope that the contacts I met and networked with will develop my…career opportunities in the near future.  Sports have always been my passion, so why not do something…that [I’m already] passionate about?”