Distinguished Guests on Campus for Turner Lynch Campus Center Opening Celebration

There was no shortage of distinguished guests on campus for the weekend of festivities celebrating the official opening of the new Turner Lynch Campus Center.

Dialogue & Deliberation, a three-part lecture series on Thursday, October 24, featured national leaders in higher education, philanthropy, and business.

Atlanta CEOs discuss “Closing the Gap,” addressing the economy and the implications of the market for achieving the “American Dream.” Featuring: Jack Guynn, Moderator (Retired President and CEO, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta); John Wieland, Chairman and CEO, John Wieland Homes and Neighborhoods; Robert Balentine, Chairman and CEO, Balentine; Richard Smith, Chairman and CEO, Equifax; and, Thomas Fanning, Chairman, President and CEO, Southern Company.

Atlanta area philanthropists discuss “Philanthropy and Change” and how agents of change can impact their communities locally and around the globe. Featuring:
John Stephenson, moderator and executive director, J. Bulow Campbell Foundation; Lillian Giornelli, president, CF Foundation; Penelope McPhee, president, The Arthur M. Blank Foundation; and, Kathleen Pattillo, co-founder and trustee, The Rockdale Foundation.

University presidents from around the country discuss “What Are We Doing Right in Higher Education?” addressing the state of higher education. Featuring: Kevin Riley, moderator and editor of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Dr. Mark Becker, president, Georgia State University; Dr. John McCardell, vice chancellor, Sewanee: The University of the South; Dr. John Sexton, president, New York University; Dr. James Wagner, president, Emory University; and, Dr. Lawrence Schall, president, Oglethorpe University.

Kinko's founding partners John and Annie Odell with their daughter Katie Odell, a 2012 Oglethorpe graduate.

Kinko’s founding partners John and Annie Odell with their daughter Katie Odell, a 2012 Oglethorpe graduate.

On Friday, October 25, the Oglethorpe Women’s Network hosted “Why OWNership Matters: Duplicating Kinko’s Success,” as part of the Rikard Lecture Series, which introduces students to current issues in business as presented by successful business and civic leaders.

Guest speakers were Annie and John Odell, parents of OU alumna Katie Odell ’12 and the founding partners of Kinko’s. They shared their inspiring personal and professional success story of growing and expanding Kinko’s. The Kinko’s business model of ownership set a standard for its founding partners and customers to live, work and play in their communities. Annie also spoke about the balance between motherhood and her career, telling anecdotes about her eldest son running around in a playpen at the back of her store, and Katie scanning her face with the copy machines. Her family became a part of the Kinko’s family, and vice versa. She says that the love she and her colleagues had for their work and their customers was the key to their success.

The weekend’s Fall Festival also drew a crowd to experience the new Turner Lynch Campus Center and to celebrate the season:

Gates Millennium Scholar Selects Oglethorpe

009Oglethorpe freshman Lila Siwakoti ’17 says that he’s thankful for many things. He should also be very proud of his accomplishments.

Lila was born in a refugee camp in Nepal and immigrated to the U.S. in 2009, thanks to a sponsorship from the International Rescue Committee. Founded in 1933 at the request of Albert Einstein, the nonprofit responds to the world’s worst humanitarian crises and offers lifesaving care and life-changing assistance to refugees forced to flee from war or disaster.

“Refugee life is not like a regular life,” says Lila. “You live at home in fear. You have food and medical shortages.” Adapting to a foreign culture and language was rough for him, he says. But over time, Lila and his family settled in to life in the U.S. and he says he is thankful to live here. Lila eventually became fluent enough in English to take AP and Honors classes and credits his religion, Hinduism, with helping him do well in school.

Gates-Millennium-Scholars-logoSo well, in fact, that Lila was awarded a Gates Millennium Scholarship, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The scholarship is awarded to outstanding minority students with significant financial need. This year’s applicant pool for the scholarship was record-breaking, according to Lila. More than 54,000 students applied but only 1,000 are selected each year. To put this into perspective, less than 2% of applicants were accepted this year.

To qualify, students must demonstrate leadership abilities and academic distinction. They must also have two nominations for the scholarship—one for academics and one recommending the student for their leadership qualities. Lila graduated with a 3.9 GPA from Clarkston High School and actively participated in his community through volunteer work.

Lila chose to attend Oglethorpe because of Oglethorpe’s small class sizes. He likes the fact that you are able to visit professors during office hours and they know who you are rather than be a nameless member of the class. Plus, his family is important to him and the campus’s proximity allows him to remain close to them. He considers the scholarship a “blessing” and is currently deliberating on majoring in computer science and minoring in economics.

As part of the scholarship requirements, Lila participates as an ambassador for the Gates Millenium Scholarship program and is currently helping students from his alma mater with the application process. Ultimately, Lila wants to go back to Nepal or Africa and volunteer: “My long term goal is to help people.”

OU Freshman Doubles as Advice Columnist

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Advice columnist Curtis Jones lounges in the Starbucks in Oglethorpe’s Turner Lynch Campus Center.

At first glance, Curtis Jones ’17 seems fairly typical amidst the throng of students in the campus Starbucks. You’d never guess that he has a “secret identity”: Curtis is an advice columnist for metro Atlanta teens.

The Oglethorpe freshman writes for Vox, a nonprofit teen magazine based in Atlanta that is “the voice of Atlanta teens.” It’s the city’s largest publication created by and for teens without censorship. The magazine is distributed to high schools and community groups. Vox also offers a blog, an after school program, and summer seminars for students interested in learning how to cover “new multimedia techniques for storytelling, the fundamentals of journalism, poetry, photography and design.

According to Curtis, he stumbled into his writing position when he was a high school senior. He had dropped by Vox’s office with friends already involved in the magazine and discovered that the Vox volunteers and students were “welcoming and friendly,” so he immediately asked how he could get involved.

VoxCurtis had always been interested in writing music and lyrics but has discovered that he also enjoys the kind of writing he gets to do for Vox. He worked his way up and took over the advice column at the end of the summer of 2013. The questions he answers tend to be staff-generated, but students are also encouraged to submit questions to the editor. The questions can range anywhere from academics to even more personal questions regarding relationships.

Curtis’ community involvement already extends to Oglethorpe as well. On campus, he’s active with the Black Student Caucus and OUtlet and is interested in joining the staff of the student newspaper, The Stormy Petrel. He hasn’t yet decided on a major, but is debating between communications or fields like counseling or social work. “I just want to help people,” he says,”That’s something that I’ve always known that I get joy out of.”

Ultimately, he chose to attend Oglethorpe for multiple reasons. Curtis says he “fell in love” with the campus itself during Admitted Students Day, plus the diversity of the campus was a determining factor. “It’s really big to me to be able to interact with so many different people.”

Curtis is a positive and determined student who by all indications will be a future campus leader.  Check out Curtis and his VOX colleague Akil singing about why “VOX rocks”:

Zipcar is coming to Oglethorpe!

Signing up is easy!

Signing up is easy!

Students, faculty and staff—we have a new addition to our campus this fall!  “Zipcar for Universities” will provide a new way to navigate the city. Zipcar is car-sharing service that enables patrons to reserve a car for either a few hours or for an entire day.

Perfect for students who lack their own mode of transportation—or are tired of asking friends for rides—Zipcar gives you freedom and some pretty great perks. As part of the deal, while you’re using Zipcar, you’re protected with insurance and are provided a gas card to fill up whenever you need. A standard day’s fee allows up to 180 miles of travel, but can be easily extended at any time. And, as their website says, “Zipcar for Universities offers the convenience of car ownership without the hassles of having a car on campus.”

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Just tap your Zipcard and GO!

The process is simple: after registering, easily reserve your time to drive directly from your computer or cell phone. Once it’s time to drive, unlock your car with your zipcard and you’re ready to go.

In order to partake in the Zipcar experience you must be 18 or older and have a valid driver’s license. To register, go to Zipcar’s website exclusively for Oglethorpe, where you can receive a discounted application fee and learn more details about their services.

You Could be Driving this Ford Focus!

You could be driving this Ford Focus!

OUr zipcars will be located next to Hearst Hall in the fall. In the meantime, Zipcar members can use the zipcars located at the Brookhaven MARTA Station. Some Oglethorpe students have already taken a test drive—make sure you find time to zip, too!