Oglethorpe President Published in Huffington iPad Magazine

President Schall’s personal blog post was published in a recent edition of Huffington, a new iPad magazine produced by The Huffington Post.

Dr. Schall first posted the article on his personal blog, My Own Stormy Petrel Words, reflecting on the question “why do people cheat” in response to the news of a data reporting scandal at Emory University. He says that cheating starts because people are acting to attain the unattainable “when so much is at stake and the wrong thing is being measured, even good people will bend the truth.” Dr. Schall’s article was picked for publication in the August 24th edition of Huffington magazine and will reach more than 115,000 iPad readers worldwide, with more users downloading every  day.

The free weekly iPad magazine was launched mid-June 2012 as a part of a HuffPost “slows news movement” initiative, a way for readers to dive more deeply into stories than is possible online. iPad users can download the app to read Dr. Schall’s article in the iTunes store, and other readers can  read the article directly on his blog. Consider subscribing to get his latest blogs delivered directly to you.

Explore Ancient Greece at Oglethorpe

Are you ready for a virtual trip to ancient Greece?  Next week Oglethorpe University will present two art history lectures that will sweep you away to these ancient worlds.

“Look and listen: Poet, artist and patron in ancient Greece”

Oglethorpe will welcome Dr. Jasper Gaunt, the curator of Greek and Roman art at Emory University’s Michael C. Carlos Museum, who will lecture about Greek artifacts as they relate to the study of the texts of Herodotus, Homer and Thucydides. The lecture will take place on Monday, September 12 at 6:30 p.m. in Lupton Auditorium, and a reception will follow in the Great Hall of Hearst.

“The Minoan Mystery”

The next evening, Dr. Jeffrey Collins, assistant professor of art history at Oglethorpe, will lecture about Minoan archaeology. The Minoan culture, pre-dating the ancient Greeks, was one of the most intriguing and mysterious cultures in the ancient world.

“Archaeology informs us, mythology inspires us,” said Dr. Collins. “Both archaeology and mythology help reveal a mysterious people who built palaces, painted extraordinary frescoes, and traded as seafarers in the ancient world.  Who were they?”  He will help answer this question and lead the audience on a visual journey through the history and the mystery.  Dr. Collins will present the most recent findings and ideas about the Minoan culture on Tuesday, September 13 at 7:30 p.m. in the OU Museum of Art.

Both lectures are free and open to the public.

Dr. Collins also is the director of the Study Abroad program at Oglethorpe University (OUSA). For more information about OUSA and the study abroad opportunities for OU students to visit this ancient art up close and personally, contact Jessica Sundstrom.

Photos: Dr. Jasper Gaunt; The Bull-Leaping Fresco from the Great Palace at Knossos, Crete.

OU Petrel to Tour with the Indigo Girls

When he was thirteen years old, Ben Williams ’11 knew he wanted to play the guitar.  His “practical Jewish mother” had one piece of advice:  “She said, play the bass because you’ll make more money that way,” recalls Ben.  “Everyone plays the guitar.”  Now, the OU communication major is gearing up for his first big job as a bass guitarist.  Starting in June, Ben and his four bandmates will hit the road as the opening act for the legendary folk rock group the Indigo Girls.

Since joining the local pop group The Shadowboxers last summer, Ben spent much of his senior year traveling with his band.  “Playing music is definitely a dream job,” said Ben.  “It’s fun pursuing something that can seem a little impractical.”

Ben recently sat down with the Oglethorpe Blog to share on video a little more about the band, meeting the Indigo Girls, and which OU professor he hopes to see at their Atlanta stop…