Getting in the Spirit at Oglethorpe

Craig Bourne '15 shows off his smile after discussing OU spirit.

Craig Borne ’15

Craig Borne ’15 has a not-so-secret mission: to help students feel more spirited on campus.

Borne’s identity is not a government super agent but rather a super student at Oglethorpe. (Sorry, had to do it!) He’s a biopsychology major with a double minor in sociology and chemistry. To top this off, he’s a member of the tennis team, the Student Athletic Advisory Committee and Phi Delta Epsilon, and is trying to help start a new fraternity on campus, Delta Sigma Phi.

Borne also is in the midst of writing a charter for the Spirit Squad, and hopes to get the new student club approved soon. Through the club, he wants to help keep the school mascot active through try-outs for the most spirited Petey the Petrel and hopes to increase attendance at athletic events by building school pride. Our university has much to be proud of—not only athletic championships (let’s hear for men’s soccer and golf!) but all of the efforts and accomplishments by every team, athlete and student. Borne says he wants all students to feel connected to our collective accomplishments and to be proud and to show it.

Petey’s got spirit, how about you?

Borne encourages Oglethorpe students to get involved on campus and says there’s a club for everyone. Black & Gold Club in the Admission Office is just one example of a way students can get involved on campus and interact with prospective freshmen and their families. There is also a variety of Greek Life on campus between honor societies and traditional sororities and fraternities. And the best part is, if you don’t think there’s a club for you: start one! Gather a group of friends and create the club for you.

Borne is even thinking about the future of the club after he graduates. He wants to put a five-year plan into effect that will help to care for the mascot uniform and create pep rallies to get students excited for upcoming events on campus.

Why is school spirit so important to have? “It’s really tough to make something better without support,” says Borne. “And if we want to make the school better, we need to be better at having spirit for our school.”

 

International Mentoring Program Unites EF and OU Students

That's me in the front with my protege, Max from Germany.

That’s me in the front with my protege, Max from Germany.

In July 2012, Oglethorpe partnered with Education First (EF), an international language provider that allows students to study language and culture in diverse environments around the world, including 14 North American cities. Atlanta is their most recent location.

As the cultural hub of the south, Atlanta is attractive to many international students and the educational and social opportunities in the city have created a surge of interest for EF’s Atlanta campus. Over the past year Oglethorpe’s campus has welcomed dozens of students from China, Germany, Venezuela, Korea, Honduras, and other countries all over the world.

EF protégés and OU mentors meet for the first time at orientation.

EF protégés and OU mentors meet for the first time at orientation.

In response, Oglethorpe has launched an international mentoring program to help provide a welcoming environment and encourage interaction between Oglethorpe and EF students. Led by Campus Life, the program pairs OU and EF students together with the goal of encouraging more opportunities to interact socially and a greater chance to learn from one another. Emmanuel Brantley ’15, an OU student organizer for the program, says “this program is very important because it provides the EF-Atlanta students with what they came to this specific location for—an interactive collegiate learning experience.”

This initial program pilot includes 11 pairs of OU student mentors and EF student protégés. I was paired with Max, a German native in the EF’s University Transition Program, and from our perspective, the pairs were well selected. We are already learning from each other about culture (especially sports) and language—I am studying German and Max is trying to master English. The program is successful in its goal to create more of an opportunity for friendship rather than feeling like a formal partnership.

EFLogo(2)(1)Each pair of students meets once a week to talk about classes and what’s happening in each others’ lives, and have been asked to journal about our experiences to present at the monthly all-member meeting.

EF Mentorship OrlandoDiego Cassy (2)Though these will be the only formal meetings, we’re already started to build networks of friends that are bringing together the EF and OU students. Max, my friends and I have planned trips to basketball games, whitewater rafting, and casual evenings to watch sports, and other partners are beginning to do the same.

The main goal of the program is to lead by example—that students in the program will be role models for mutual understanding about each others’ perspectives, cultures, and experiences. “The international mentoring program is an effort to unify the EF community and the traditional Oglethorpe community,” concluded program leader Robin Brandt, director of experiential learning “and we already have seen successes.”

For me, the program is an opportunity to become a more globally aware individual while simultaneously making my home and school a welcoming place for international students.

One Senior’s Oglethorpe Bucket List: 20 Must-Do Activities for Every Stormy Petrel

Janet Wood '13

With a less than two weeks left until graduation, reality has started to set in. Soon, Oglethorpe will not only be my university: it will be my alma mater.

As a senior, everything from conversations with nostalgic friends to commencement updates constantly remind me that this formal departure from my second home is imminent. That being said, I find myself reflecting on not only my Oglethorpe experience, but the parts of OU that I have not yet experienced.

During a discussion in my senior psychology class the idea came up to create an Oglethorpe bucket list—a list of things that every Petrel must do before the long-awaited graduation day. I’ve asked OU students and alumni to submit items to the bucket list, and compiled them below. So Petrels, next time you’re looking for a good Ogle-adventure, why not scratch a few things off “OUr” bucket list?

  1. Walk around campus at night and discover how breathtaking Oglethorpe looks after dark
  2. Pull an all-nighter in the 24 Hour Room
  3. Have a picnic, play Frisbee, or just enjoy the weather on the quad with some friends
  4. Enjoy telescope night on the roof of the library
  5. Sunbathe with some friends at  the baseball stadium when no one else is there
  6.  Run through the sprinklers on the quad
  7. Go to lunch at that one restaurant you’ve been meaning to try ever since you got to Oglethorpe
  8. Watch a meteor shower from the Traer courtyard or soccer field
  9. Take MARTA downtown and explore the city—no plan, no destination, just a free afternoon and sense of adventure
  10. Visit all the Atlanta hotspots (i.e. World of Coke, CNN, Piedmont Park, Georgia Aquarium, Rocky Horror Picture Show, High Museum, etc.)
  11. Try to take a picture of the Ogle-turkey, Ogle-kitty, Fratcoon, or whatever animal is roaming the campus at the time
  12. Show your support: go to an Oglethorpe play, cheer on the Petrels at a sporting event, go to Greek Sing, visit the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art
  13. Be an active member or participant of something
  14. Drive to Buford Highway and try a new food that you’ve never heard of and cannot pronounce
  15. Have a mini photo shoot in Little 5 Points
  16. Be adventurous. Go white water rafting on the Chattahoochee River, skydive, rock climb at Atlanta Rocks, etc.
  17. Be in a campus publication
  18. Climb a tree on campus
  19. Take a road trip with a friend and spend the night in a new city
  20. Count how many Oglethorpe T-shirts you have…I promise it will be more than you thought

And don’t forget, there’s always Alumni Weekend to finish checking off the list! So, what would YOU add to the list?

Thank you to the contributors of this list: Katie Goddard, Tori Lloyd, Justin Sabree, Betsy Rosillo, Rieddhi Shah, Christian Hartnett, Joshua Steltzer, Morgan Coffey, Marisa Manuel, Dr. Zinner’s History and Systems class.