Science-Palooza Helps Students’ Academic and Professional Development

Cancer Biology students also hosted a cancer awareness event that was featured on Cure Childhood Cancer's website.

A few weeks ago, Oglethorpe students majoring in biology, chemistry and psychology were able to verbally and visually present to the entire OU community on the topics they studied this semester. The annual Science-Palooza poster session event featured approximately 50 different presentations, and some students were responsible for more than just one. As attendees approached, students were prepared to explain their research and answer questions presented to them about their work.

Students enrolled in “Cancer Biology” explained the multiple processes of how cancer cells travel to organs in the body. “Cell Biology” students conducted experiments that showed how different chemicals can affect cell growth and development. Psychology students expanded on previous psychological research by creating experiments that focused on everything from race and pro-social behavior to belief in being able to influence random chance events. Some of the content may have been a little difficult to understand if you are not familiar with terms like HELA cells, metastasis, and partial eta effect sizes. Nonetheless, each presentation added its own special touch to the array of scientific topics present at the college-leveled science fair.

Allyson Terry '14 presents her psychology research during Science-Palooza.

Presenting at this event does a lot more for the students involved than simply showing off the eye-catching posters they created. By presenting at this Science-Palooza myself, I experienced the effects that an event like this can have on a student’s academic and professional development. As a Psychology major, I conducted a study that looked at how people perceive interracial couples in comparison to same-race couples. Every time someone came up to me I had to give a three-minute spiel explaining my strenuous four months of hard work. It seemed redundant and cumbersome at times, but the more I interacted with spectators interested in my research, the more comfortable and fluid I became in presenting.

Another plus to presenting at the session is when questions are asked and you are the only one that can answer them. Being solid in your approach and strong in your knowledge of the topic you studied increases the feeling of accomplishment. Conducting individual research is a difficult task, but when you have the opportunity to share all you have done with people who are genuinely interested, you know your late nights in the library have not gone in vain.

Events such as Science-Palooza enable students of different majors and academic interests to see first-hand what their peers are doing on campus. The only improvement to the event that I might suggest is hosting it in a larger venue in order to accommodate the large number of attendees!

Pegasus Creative is pleased to welcome Allyson Terry ’14 as the campus reporter intern for summer 2013!

 

 

Oglethorpe Alumni Excel in Medical Illustration Field

Nobles Green '03

Are you a biology major with an artistic touch, or an art major with an appreciation for science? Did you know about the career of medical illustration? Within the last decade, three Oglethorpe students have chosen to pursue this challenging career, and the rewards have been well worth the hard work.

Nobles Green ’03, an award-winning senior medical animator for Nucleus Medical Media, creates medical animations for a variety of clients, including pharmaceutical companies and TV shows like Dr. Oz and Oprah.

“I’ve always liked art and science growing up,” he said. “For a while I just wanted to pursue an art career, but the more I learned about biology… there was something that made me interested…There’s a lot of problem solving, so far as knowing what your client wants and knowing how to visualize what they’re saying, what scientific theories they want to express.”

Sarah Duff ’12 also works for Nucleus Medical Media, as the Production Assistant for Legal Medical Art at Nucleus Medical Media.  Nobles was integral in Sarah’s decision to enter the medical illustration field.

“He visited my senior year [at Oglethorpe] and I asked him what he did,” she said. “He gave me a chance to tour the company, to look around and see what it was like. Then in August, Nobles emailed me to tell me there was a job opening.”

Similarly, Katie Dale ’10 who was a double major in biology and art, found Nobles to be of great assistance in her quest to work for Nucleus Medical Media.

“All I did was contact Nobles,” she said, “and he was helpful and so nice, and he got me an internship… I always knew I wanted to be in the medical field though I wasn’t sure specifically what. I didn’t actually declare a major until the end of my junior year… one of my [golf] teammates was looking into [medical illustration] because she was an art major, and she told me I should look into it and I thought it was perfect for me. I didn’t have to give up my love of art, and I could still be in a science field!”

Nobles himself credits the decision to pursue medical illustration largely to Associate Professor of Art Alan Loehle.

“He’s been very encouraging, very helpful all throughout Oglethorpe,” said Nobles, “so I did all the mandatory classes with him as well as some individualized [classes]… I like to help OU students out, [and] every time Loehle tells me about someone I try to help them out, give them a tour.”

Thanks to faculty and alumni, these graduates have found a place in the competitive world of medical illustration. As Sarah advises, “Don’t be scared around alumni because they’re going to want to help you succeed..I’m so lucky to have this job because I absolutely love it.”

Greekapalooza: Party for a Cause

OU Greeks come together to support The DRCC

Oglethorpe University’s chapter of Chi Phi fraternity raised more than $600 to benefit the DeKalb Rape Crisis Center at their annual charity event, Greekapalooza, on Friday, September 14.

Donations increased almost 100% over last year’s event, in part because Chi Phi offered a free benefit show played by local musicians, the Critty Upchurch Band, who played covers of popular songs at the Greek Row block party.

Edmund Smith, a sophomore brother of Chi Phi, says that donating to support the cause is important, but the bigger goal was to raise awareness for the DRCC. “Though we hope OU students never need it, we want people to know that there is a place they can go for help.”

OU Greeks watch the Critty Upchurch Band at Greekapalooza.

Not only did Greekapalooza raise money to help the victims of rape and sexual violence, it was also the first event of OU’s Fall 2012 Greek Recruitment/Rush. All of the Greek organizations at Oglethorpe attended to show support and to meet potential pledges.

“Greekapalooza is basically a great way for OU’s Greek organizations to come together, fraternize, and unite behind a great cause,” said Chelsea Reed ’13.  “It is the perfect kickoff for recruitment because it shows that Oglethorpe Greeks value community and philanthropy—both on campus and beyond.”

Photos by Robert Findley.

“Twelfth Night” at Oglethorpe

The OU Playmakers’ performed the classic Shakespeare comedy, Twelfth Night in April of 2010. This Shakespearean comedy made many laugh, cry, and laugh until they cried.

Set in Illyria, the play uses mistaken identity as the source of its humor. Viola, the lead character, finds herself in a sticky situation after she shipwrecks on the shores of Illyria. She masquerades as Cesario and becomes a servant to Duke Orsino, who is in love with Lady Olivia. When Orsino sends Cesario to tell Olivia of his love for her, however, Lady Olivia falls in love with Cesario, believing he is a man. Meanwhile, Cesario begins to fall for Orsino, creating a classic love triangle. The story becomes even more complicated when Viola’s brother, Sebastian–whom she believes is dead–shows up and woos Olivia. The comical subplot of the play adds even more twists to this web of romantic adventure, intensifying this clever comedy.

The play was directed by Allen O’Reilly with Georgia Shakespeare, the professional theater-in-residence at Oglethorpe University.

Twelfth Night ran April 8-10 in the Conant Performing Arts Center, and was the last play of the 2010 season.

Send the elevator back down

“I believe that if you’ve been successful in what you wanted to do in your life, then it’s your obligation to spend a good portion of your time sending the elevator back down,” actor Kevin Spacey has said. “I’ve tried today to tell you how much my experience has been shaped by those who came before me – what drives me now and motivates me today, and what will continue to inspire those that follow. The truth is…all of us can send the elevator back down because it doesn’t matter what floor you’re on – in life – there’s always someone just below – just waiting for the chance to be invited in.”   (Watch video here).

Lupton bell tower stairs looking down

Oglethorpe University doesn’t have many elevators on its campus; we have bookoos of staircases. You’ll constantly see faculty and staff members huffing and puffing their way up the stairs in Hearst and Lupton Halls. The students don’t seem to have as much of a problem with the never-ending stairs. 

What’s the point of this post, you ask? Well, the Alumni Office encourages alumni – once they’ve climbed the corporate ladder (or gone up the elevator…) and are the ones doing the hiring – to think of OU students and recent grads. Send the down elevator to pick up some Petrels so they can start their own careers…and one day they’ll be able to send the elevator back down.

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