Salvador Dalí, Mid Century Modern Exhibitions Headline at OU Museum of Art

This summer, the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art is presenting three concurrent exhibitions: MID CENTURY MODERN: Works on PaperSALVADOR DALÍ: Trilogy of Love, and KIMO MINTON: Jazz Abstractions, all on view through August 31.

“These exhibitions are inspired by the creative outpouring of art at mid 20th century, much of which was influenced by American jazz in its improvisational rhythm,” said OUMA Director Elizabeth Peterson. “Artists pulled narratives of dreamscape, religion, love, war, and other thematic motifs into a language of geometric and organic form, line, and color. This visual vocabulary could be combined or repeated like a musician playing variations on a theme.”

Joan Miró (1893-1983) The Lizzard with Golden Feathers

Joan Miró (1893-1983)
The Lizzard with Golden Feathers

MID CENTURY MODERN: Works on Paper features fine prints by American mid 20th century artists Alexander Calder, Helen Frankenthaler, Larry Rivers, Jim Dine, Adolph Gottlieb, and American composer/artist John Cage with Carl Sumsion are on loan from the Robert W. Woodruff Library at Emory University. Prints by Joan Miró, Marc Chagall, and others in the OUMA permanent collection will also be on view. These 1960s and ’70s works are a powerful representation of the Modernist, Surrealist, Abstract Expressionist movements in the U.S. and abroad. They also touch on the Color Field, Dada, and Kinetic art movements.

Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) The Prince of Love (The Hanged Man)

Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) The Prince of Love (The Hanged Man)

SALVADOR DALI: Trilogy of Love features a selection of large format lithographs by Salvador Dalí (1904-1989), including those in his Trilogy of Love series and his Retrospective Suite. Never one to embrace convention, this Spanish born giant of the Surrealist movement broke with fine print tradition producing hundreds of signed editions of his work. These prints are part of the OUMA permanent collection.

Kimo Minton (1950) Speak Riddles to Me

Kimo Minton (1950)
Speak Riddles to Me

KIMO MINTON: Jazz Abstractions presents a selection of color woodcuts, mixed media work, and sculpture by contemporary artist Kimo Minton (born 1950), courtesy of Atlanta’s TEW Galleries and the artist. Minton, whose work has been compared to that of American artist Stuart Davis (1892-1964) is pleased to embrace musical aesthetic viewers ascribe to his work. His free standing sculptures and bas relief wall pieces also bring to mind the work of one of the earliest Abstract artists Russian/French Wassily Kandinsky (1866-1944).

Oglethorpe University Museum of Art is open Tuesday-Sunday, 12 noon to 5 p.m. and closed Mondays and university holidays. General admission is $5. OUMA members and children under 12 receive free admission. Parking is free. OUMA is located on the third floor of Lowry Hall.

OUMA is supported by the Georgia Council for the Arts and is a proud member of Blue Star Museums, offering free admission to members of the military and their families from Memorial Day through Labor Day. OUMA is a member of the Southeastern Museums Conference, the American Alliance of Museums, and the Association of Academic Museums and Galleries. For more information, visit museum.oglethorpe.edu or call 404-364-8555.

OU Freshman Doubles as Advice Columnist

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Advice columnist Curtis Jones lounges in the Starbucks in Oglethorpe’s Turner Lynch Campus Center.

At first glance, Curtis Jones ’17 seems fairly typical amidst the throng of students in the campus Starbucks. You’d never guess that he has a “secret identity”: Curtis is an advice columnist for metro Atlanta teens.

The Oglethorpe freshman writes for Vox, a nonprofit teen magazine based in Atlanta that is “the voice of Atlanta teens.” It’s the city’s largest publication created by and for teens without censorship. The magazine is distributed to high schools and community groups. Vox also offers a blog, an after school program, and summer seminars for students interested in learning how to cover “new multimedia techniques for storytelling, the fundamentals of journalism, poetry, photography and design.

According to Curtis, he stumbled into his writing position when he was a high school senior. He had dropped by Vox’s office with friends already involved in the magazine and discovered that the Vox volunteers and students were “welcoming and friendly,” so he immediately asked how he could get involved.

VoxCurtis had always been interested in writing music and lyrics but has discovered that he also enjoys the kind of writing he gets to do for Vox. He worked his way up and took over the advice column at the end of the summer of 2013. The questions he answers tend to be staff-generated, but students are also encouraged to submit questions to the editor. The questions can range anywhere from academics to even more personal questions regarding relationships.

Curtis’ community involvement already extends to Oglethorpe as well. On campus, he’s active with the Black Student Caucus and OUtlet and is interested in joining the staff of the student newspaper, The Stormy Petrel. He hasn’t yet decided on a major, but is debating between communications or fields like counseling or social work. “I just want to help people,” he says,”That’s something that I’ve always known that I get joy out of.”

Ultimately, he chose to attend Oglethorpe for multiple reasons. Curtis says he “fell in love” with the campus itself during Admitted Students Day, plus the diversity of the campus was a determining factor. “It’s really big to me to be able to interact with so many different people.”

Curtis is a positive and determined student who by all indications will be a future campus leader.  Check out Curtis and his VOX colleague Akil singing about why “VOX rocks”:

Josh Harris ’10: Making a Living by Making Laughs

Josh Harris '10

Josh Harris ’10

After being featured in the Carillon magazine last winter, Josh Harris ’10 has made major strides in his career as a comedian. He launched his own website and shares his love of comedy by teaching stand-up comedy classes at yourACT Acting Studios in Decatur, Ga.

While continuing to do live stand-up, Josh has shifted from being on stage to being on screen. This transition came after Josh realized that writing and producing are equally important components of comedy as performing. As a result, he’s created a series of comedy videos to test his new interests.

One video was taped on the Oglethorpe campus in the Dorough gym. The video is based on “The Brand Expanders,” one of Josh’s regular sketch comedy routines that centers around a pair of marketing men who pitch crazy ideas to famous figures. In the video shot on campus, Darth Vader is promoting his own sports drink called Vaderade. Check out the video to see what happens!

Josh attributes the success of the video shoot to the numerous students and alumni who came out to volunteer as extras and to support his endeavor. This connection with students (along with a sweet alumni deal offered by OU’s special events department to use the space!) made for a rewarding and progressive experience in Josh’s career. His comedy videos are now showcased at Sketchworks in Decatur where they’re some of the most requested sketches at the theater.

The OU community can support Josh Harris by attending one of his many stand-up performances or by taking his stand-up comedy class at yourACT. Even if you aren’t a comedian, Josh says that the experience of being on stage also improves public speaking skills and boosts confidence. Now who wouldn’t want that?

“I really love not only performing stand-up, but there’s something about having your own vision and putting it on paper. Just having a crazy concept and then seeing it, bringing it to life…now that’s really something I enjoy doing.”