New Oglethorpe Journal of Undergraduate Research Showcases Students’ Work

Like most college seniors—whether they’re budding writers, scientists, researchers, economists, artists, etc.—I want people to read and see my work, to ask questions, to challenge it. In other words, I want to be published. Thanks to Oglethorpe, I now have that chance.

The new Oglethorpe Journal of Undergraduate Research is a scholarly, peer-reviewed publication that promotes undergraduate research by preserving and making available the academic and creative inventions from our campus. The Journal serves as both a digital repository of scholarly output and a platform for publishing inventive and original works. Various types of submissions are accepted, including research articles, photography, book reviews, conference posters and more.

“It is one of the most rewarding and fulfilling things I’ve done since starting at Oglethorpe,” said Ashley N. Dawson ’16, one of the first students to be published. “I’ve wanted to be a published author since I was a little girl, and the Journal and its supporters made that dream a reality. It truly is an amazing feeling to see your thoughts on the screen, and to know that people are reading them and sharing them with others.”

The Journal was started thanks to the efforts of Anne Salter, university librarian and director of Philip Weltner Library, and Laura Masce, university archivist. While attending a conference at Kennesaw State University, they learned about the idea and the possibility of partnering with the institution. Kennesaw would host the site, and Oglethorpe students would be able to send submissions to their own, separate journal for their alma mater.

“We began getting the faculty on board…and there was a lot of interest,” said Anne. “We were determined to do this.”

Being published is incredibly helpful for a resume, and the process for publication is simple: write your thesis, talk to your advisor, and then submit!  A team of editors review the work and inform those who submit of any changes or problems before the work is published. The editors are David Evans, dean and assistant vice-president of library services at Kennesaw, and Oglethorpe faculty: Dr. Charles Baube, professor of biology; Dr. Michael Rulison, professor of physics; and Dr. Linda Taylor, professor of English.

Five freshman honors students, Derek C. Wolter ’16, Ashley N. Dawson ’16, Tali M. Schroeder ’16, Tabitha Clark ’16 and Grace B. Djokoto ’16, have already taken advantage of this opportunity, and the Journal is continuing to take submissions on a rolling basis.

“My article is about Inuit mythology and its influence in a children’s film,” said Tali. “Ms. Salter makes the publishing process very easy, and I would definitely recommend it to those who are unsure of submitting an article.”

“If you are seriously considering graduate school and doing original research,” added Anne, “coming to [Oglethorpe] is a great place to begin that research.”

Attention Oglethorpe students!  Why not take advantage of this opportunity? There are many ways to learn more: contact Anne Salter, visit the Journal’s website, or you can even watch Weston Manders’ “This Week in Oglethorpe Arts” video episode that features interviews about the new Journal.

Liberal Arts & Sciences Symposium Spotlights Students’ Efforts

At the morning Biology Poster Session, Mary Vallerie explained her work on "Planned Elimination and Regulations of Raccoon Rabies in the United States by Virtue of Collaboration."

Tuesday was a day of intellectual celebration as Oglethorpe hosted a full day of academic presentations at its 2011 Liberal Arts and Sciences Symposium.  The annual symposium provides a forum for students and faculty to discuss and learn from a series of student-led presentations in their fields of study.  This year, topics ranged from “A Sampling of Current Research in Personality Psychology” to “Media Messages and Effects: An Exploration of Our Contemporary Media Environment” to “Service-Learning in Moscow – HIS 290: Russia’s Social Crisis.”

Mr. NDongo, author of "Historia and Tragedia del Guinea Equitorial," autographs an OU student's book.

This year, attendees also had the opportunity to hear from Mr. Donato NDongo Bidyogo, a well-known writer from Equatorial Guinea. Now a resident of Spain, he spoke about the impact of colonialism, the African influence on Spanish language and literature, and the individual “self” in modern writing.

To top off the day-long celebration of student achievement, the afternoon’s annual Honors and Awards Convocation recognized individuals who had excelled during the academic year.

Dr. Jeffrey Collins presents several students with awards to honor their hard work throughout the year.