Salvador Dalí, Mid Century Modern Exhibitions Headline at OU Museum of Art

This summer, the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art is presenting three concurrent exhibitions: MID CENTURY MODERN: Works on PaperSALVADOR DALÍ: Trilogy of Love, and KIMO MINTON: Jazz Abstractions, all on view through August 31.

“These exhibitions are inspired by the creative outpouring of art at mid 20th century, much of which was influenced by American jazz in its improvisational rhythm,” said OUMA Director Elizabeth Peterson. “Artists pulled narratives of dreamscape, religion, love, war, and other thematic motifs into a language of geometric and organic form, line, and color. This visual vocabulary could be combined or repeated like a musician playing variations on a theme.”

Joan Miró (1893-1983) The Lizzard with Golden Feathers

Joan Miró (1893-1983)
The Lizzard with Golden Feathers

MID CENTURY MODERN: Works on Paper features fine prints by American mid 20th century artists Alexander Calder, Helen Frankenthaler, Larry Rivers, Jim Dine, Adolph Gottlieb, and American composer/artist John Cage with Carl Sumsion are on loan from the Robert W. Woodruff Library at Emory University. Prints by Joan Miró, Marc Chagall, and others in the OUMA permanent collection will also be on view. These 1960s and ’70s works are a powerful representation of the Modernist, Surrealist, Abstract Expressionist movements in the U.S. and abroad. They also touch on the Color Field, Dada, and Kinetic art movements.

Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) The Prince of Love (The Hanged Man)

Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) The Prince of Love (The Hanged Man)

SALVADOR DALI: Trilogy of Love features a selection of large format lithographs by Salvador Dalí (1904-1989), including those in his Trilogy of Love series and his Retrospective Suite. Never one to embrace convention, this Spanish born giant of the Surrealist movement broke with fine print tradition producing hundreds of signed editions of his work. These prints are part of the OUMA permanent collection.

Kimo Minton (1950) Speak Riddles to Me

Kimo Minton (1950)
Speak Riddles to Me

KIMO MINTON: Jazz Abstractions presents a selection of color woodcuts, mixed media work, and sculpture by contemporary artist Kimo Minton (born 1950), courtesy of Atlanta’s TEW Galleries and the artist. Minton, whose work has been compared to that of American artist Stuart Davis (1892-1964) is pleased to embrace musical aesthetic viewers ascribe to his work. His free standing sculptures and bas relief wall pieces also bring to mind the work of one of the earliest Abstract artists Russian/French Wassily Kandinsky (1866-1944).

Oglethorpe University Museum of Art is open Tuesday-Sunday, 12 noon to 5 p.m. and closed Mondays and university holidays. General admission is $5. OUMA members and children under 12 receive free admission. Parking is free. OUMA is located on the third floor of Lowry Hall.

OUMA is supported by the Georgia Council for the Arts and is a proud member of Blue Star Museums, offering free admission to members of the military and their families from Memorial Day through Labor Day. OUMA is a member of the Southeastern Museums Conference, the American Alliance of Museums, and the Association of Academic Museums and Galleries. For more information, visit museum.oglethorpe.edu or call 404-364-8555.

“The Crossing Over of Art & Science”

asf-2-magentaThe Oglethorpe University Museum of Art opens two new exhibitions this weekend: OPTIC CHIASM: The Crossing Over of Art & Science, presented in partnership with the inaugural Atlanta Science Festival, and BLIND/SIGHT: Conversations with the Visually Inspired.

OPTIC CHIASM - Irene K. Miller, Blink Again, 2013, monotype collage, framed 36x22

Irene K. Miller, Blink Again, 2013

OPTIC CHIASM explores the art of vision and science of sight, and includes art by Irene K. Miller, Kenn Kotara, Allan Eddy, Marcia R. Cohen, and Lisa Solomon, contemporary artists working in a variety of media, all of whom are inspired, influenced, driven and focused by and about issues of vision. Also on exhibit are the results of research in vision and optics by scientists affiliated with area institutions, including the Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center, Emory University, Georgia Health Sciences University, Georgia Regents University and Medical Center, and the Medical College of Georgia. Visitors also will have a chance to use a Camera Obscura and handheld pinhole cameras to learn more.

OPTIC CHIASM was organized by Nancy Lowe, director of Symbiosis Art + Science Alliance; Nicole Gerardo, assistant professor at Emory University, Department of Biology; and Elizabeth Peterson, director of OUMA.

Annie Maxwell, 60, blind from birth with no known cause. Photo by Billy Howard.

Annie Maxwell, 60, blind from birth with no known cause. Photo by Billy Howard.

BLIND/SIGHT, an exhibition created and organized by photographer Billy Howard and illustrator Laurie Shock, presents a collection of photographs of people with vision loss, a biography of each person including a description of their vision, and an interpretative illustration of what they see. This exhibition celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Center for the Visually Impaired and is made possible in part by CVI, VSA Arts Georgia, the Fulton County Arts Council, and Georgia Council for the Arts and the Grassroots Arts Program.

In partnership with the festival, OUMA will host three free events open to all:

  • Saturday, March 22, 12 noon-5 p.m. – Open House, with an introduction to the exhibition OPTIC CHIASM by the three co-curators at 2 p.m.
  • Wednesday, March 26, 5:00-7:00 p.m. – Public Reception, with an introduction to the exhibition OPTIC CHIASM by the three co-curators
  • Wednesday, March 26, 7:00 p.m. – Following the public reception, two lectures will be presented: “Visions: A Look at Creativity and Disability” by Elizabeth Peterson, director of OUMA, followed by “Art-Science in America: Building Up STEAM” by Nancy Lowe, director of Symbiosis Art+Science Alliance

A Wednesday Lecture Series will complement the exhibitions.  Both exhibitions run through May 4, 2014.

OU Museum of Art: “An Academic Treasure Trove”

I have always loved Japanese art. So, when I learned that my Asian Politics class was attending the OU Museum of Art’s Japanese art exhibition as part of learning about Japanese history and culture—I freaked. Two things I love had come together: learning and art.

Yoshida's woodcut "Sending Boats" series especially stood out to Jacob Tadych '14 in Dr. Steen's Japanese Literature class. WHY?

Yoshida’s woodcut “Sending Boats” series especially stood out to me. The series of images depicts the life of traditional Japanese fishermen from the same perspective during different times of day.

Both my class, taught by Dr. Stephen Herschler, and Dr. Robert Steen’s Japanese  Literature class took full advantage of having the exhibition right here on our campus at the beginning of this semester. Jiki to Hanga: Japanese Porcelain and Prints helped our classes see art as a reflection of a culture and current events, and to explore how art is a means through which cultures can exchange ideas with one another.

“Learning is more effective when it is attached to the real world and becomes not just theoretical but experiential as well,” said Dr. Herschler. “It was an incredible opportunity…(and) a truly fabulous way for the Asian Politics class to start the semester, using art to learn about not just different cultures but also philosophy, international commerce, and politics as reflected in the techniques, materials, and aesthetics of specific artistic works.”

Porcelain detail: Artist unknown. Arita, Japan, late 17th century. Collection of Oglethorpe University. Gift of Carrie Lee Jacobs Henderson.

Porcelain detail: Artist unknown. Arita, Japan, late 17th century. Collection of Oglethorpe University. Gift of Carrie Lee Jacobs Henderson.

Some of the porcelain pieces on view, for example, showed how Western culture influenced Eastern culture. Traditional Japanese art forms are stoic and minimalistic, but that contrasted with the vibrant pieces created by the Japanese for Westerners to display in their Victorian era households.

The displayed works by master printmaker Hiroshi Yoshida gave students a snapshot of Japanese culture in transition from a feudalistic society to the current industrial power. His use of traditional Japanese woodcuts and the European oil and watercolor painting techniques shows the balancing act that resulted from the mash of cultural ideals following WWII. Yoshida’s works are traditional in their minimalism, but also very impactful in that the cultural transition is gently introduced to the viewer. Most prints in the exhibit showed very traditional scenes, like Mount Fuji and shrines or fishermen on sailboats throughout the day, while others showed the shops at night seeming to suggest the beginning of using electric lights by the intensity of the shadows and the use of Western techniques.

Dr. Steen’s class was studying post WWII Japanese literature, coinciding with the time period of the Yoshida prints. His class used the exhibit as context for discussing the cultural transitions in Japan at that time and the effects on the country’s literature. “Art tells stories and I have my students write about those stories,” said Dr. Steen, who uses the themes of memory, cultural identity and travel to relate the texts back to differences in perspective. “There are many ways to make connections to the ideas that we talk about in class, even if they aren’t directly related.”

Elizabeth Peterson, the director of the OU Museum of Art, is thrilled that the classes were able to use the exhibit to compliment their classroom curriculum. “This is precisely why universities have museums—as more than a lovely place to visit—it’s an academic treasure trove for students.”

Dr. Herschler's Asian Politics Class with Dr. Terry Taylor.

Dr. Herschler’s Asian Politics class pictured with Dr. Terry Taylor, who loaned the Yoshida woodcuts to OUMA for the exhibition. Dr. Taylor gave a lecture to the class about the dedication required by Yoshida to create the woodcuts—all of which came from a selected single piece of wood.

OU Museum of Art Now Hosting Three New Exhibitions

Fernand Léger: Fétes de la faim or Feast of Hunger lithograph on display in the Oglethorpe Museum of Art

Fernand Léger: Fétes de la faim or Feast of Hunger lithograph on display in the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art

Life-long learners, students and art lovers should be sure to check out the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art’s three new exhibitions, now on view through December 8, 2013:

The 20th Century Modern Masters exhibition features more than 80 works by three of the 20th century’s modernist leaders. The lithographs, etchings and aquatints on display were inspired by collaborations or interpretations of major literary works by post WWII writers and poets. Each work on display introduces visitors to rhythmic beauty in function and form and gives insight into the artist’s thought process concerning life and literature.

hugo13

An artist’s rendition of Victor Hugo.

The French political activist Victor Hugo is best known for his books Les Miserables and Notre Dame de Paris (The Hunchback of Notre Dame). His literature and discourse has since inspired many an artist to celebrate the life and abilities of this literary master. This exhibition is on display in the Center Gallery and features drawings, prints and sculptures by a variety of artists.Most notable among these artists are Jean-François Raffaëlli and Frederick Hendrik Kaemmerer, who were both students of Jean-Léon Gerôme.

Christmas comes early this year at OUMA with Haddon Sundblom’s Santa Paintings. Sundblom is responsible for the quintessential look of The Coca-Cola Company‘s seasonal Santa style, inspired by Clement Clarke Moore 1822 poem, “A Visit from St. Nicholas“. His paintings of the jolly and plump Santa we know today were created between the 1930s and 1950s. Sundblom also is known for creating the “Quaker Man” for Quaker Oats and did work for Maxwell House, Colgate, Palmolive and Nabisco.

The Coca-Cola Company presents Haddon Sundblom's art.

Haddon Sundblom’s Santa, now on exhibit courtesy of The Coca-Cola Company.

A Wednesday Lecture Series also accompanies the exhibitions:

  • September 25, 7 p.m. “’Crommelynck’s Le Cocu Magnifique (The Magnificent Cuckold)’ illustrated by Picasso and Robert Andrew Parker,” by Dr. Jay Lutz, Professor of French, Oglethorpe University
  • October 2, 7 p.m. “Victor Hugo and French Romanticism” by Mr. John Daniel Tilford, Collections Manager, OU Museum of Art.
  • October 16, 7 p.m. “Léger, Le Corbusier, Italian Futurists, Machines, and the Dynamic City” by Dr. Jeffrey Collins, Assistant Professor of Art History, Oglethorpe University.
  • November 6, 7 p.m. “Léger’s Modernist Take on Rimbaud’s Illuminations” by Dr. Jay Lutz, Professor of French, Oglethorpe University.
  • November 20, 7 p.m. “Georges Braque Paintings and Prints” by Ms. Renée Maurer, Assistant Curator, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.
  • December 4, 7 p.m. “Keeping Christmas: From Pagan to Puritan to Popular Culture” by Ms. Elizabeth Peterson, Director, OU Museum of Art.

View the first lecture,”The Right and Left Bank of Parisian Artists: The Bateau Lavoir and the Ruche,” by OU Professor of French Jay Lutz:

The Oglethorpe University Museum of Art is open Tuesday-Sunday, 12 noon to 5 p.m. and closed Mondays and university holidays. General admission is $5; free admission for OUMA members, children under 12 and with a Petrel Pass. For more information, visit museum.oglethorpe.edu or call 404-364-8555.

OU Museum of Art Joins Blue Star Program, Offers Free Admission to Members of the Military & Their Families

Oglethorpe University Museum of Art has joined the ranks of Blue Star Museums, a collaboration among the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and a record-breaking 2,000 museums across America.

The Blue Star Museums program provides free admission for the nation’s active duty military personnel, including National Guard and Reserve, and their families to any of the participating museums from Memorial Day (Monday, May 27, 2013) through Labor Day (Monday, September 2, 2013). These military families have an opportunity to enjoy the nation’s cultural heritage and, in some instances, to learn more about their new communities after completing a military move.

The Blue Star Families organization is a national, nonprofit network of military families from all ranks and services, including guard and reserve. Blue Star is dedicated to supporting, connecting and empowering military families. Working in concert with fellow nonprofits, community advocates, and public officials, they raise awareness of the challenges and strengths of military family life and work to make military life more sustainable.

“Oglethorpe University was named as one of the 2013 Top Military Friendly Schools and a Yellow Ribbon institution, with a focus on welcoming returning servicemen and women as they transition to civilian and academic life, “ said Elizabeth Peterson, director of the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art. “Joining the ranks of Blue Star Museums to offer complimentary access to our museum is one small way in which we can continue to assist in that transition and to honor military personnel and their families.”

Oglethorpe has a long history of supporting members of the military and their families. Most recently, in fall 2012, Oglethorpe, together with the on-campus OU Veterans’ Club, devoted a week to honoring our veterans. “Our Country, Our Voices: Oglethorpe Honors Our Veterans” offered lectures, a clothing drive, and forums about such topics as what it means to be an American. OUMA hosted many of these events, with its then-exhibition “Burden of Proof: National Identity and the Legacy of War” as a fitting back drop.

Currently, the OU Museum of Art is exhibiting “Jiki to Hanga: Japanese Porcelain and Prints,” on view through August 25, 2013.