Petrel Intern Makes a Difference at the Latin American Association

479924_10151166982738446_1862507659_n (1)The Latin American Association was established in 1972 with the mission to help Latino families achieve their aspirations for their academic, social and economic advancement. This is accomplished through direct programs and integrated community partnerships that focus on youth academic achievement, education and prevention and services to families with urgent needs. Vicky Herbener ’14 is helping the association to fulfill those goals.

Vicky, an international studies major, wanted to intern with the Latin American Association because of her interest in helping immigrants to make a better life. There, she teaches English, Spanish and computer classes, plus she assists the program director with creating lesson plans. Her other duties include helping with marketing and fundraising. Vicky’s favorite part of her internship is seeing the results — the satisfaction of the people who once needed help.

10317663_10152500591464169_2758810045530574488_oAn LAA internship requires skills in writing, translating and the ability to interact effectively with different types of people. Vicky felt she was prepared thanks to her Oglethorpe education. “It’s important to translate a phrase into Spanish with the same meaning, she said, ” and because I translated so much at Oglethorpe, I felt prepared.”

Vicky advises students who are applying for internships to not to be afraid to apply for the ones you want, even those that may seem out of reach. “Don’t worry about if you have enough experience for it or not,” Vicky says. “Apply anyway, because you never know unless you try.”

Salvador Dalí, Mid Century Modern Exhibitions Headline at OU Museum of Art

This summer, the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art is presenting three concurrent exhibitions: MID CENTURY MODERN: Works on PaperSALVADOR DALÍ: Trilogy of Love, and KIMO MINTON: Jazz Abstractions, all on view through August 31.

“These exhibitions are inspired by the creative outpouring of art at mid 20th century, much of which was influenced by American jazz in its improvisational rhythm,” said OUMA Director Elizabeth Peterson. “Artists pulled narratives of dreamscape, religion, love, war, and other thematic motifs into a language of geometric and organic form, line, and color. This visual vocabulary could be combined or repeated like a musician playing variations on a theme.”

Joan Miró (1893-1983) The Lizzard with Golden Feathers

Joan Miró (1893-1983)
The Lizzard with Golden Feathers

MID CENTURY MODERN: Works on Paper features fine prints by American mid 20th century artists Alexander Calder, Helen Frankenthaler, Larry Rivers, Jim Dine, Adolph Gottlieb, and American composer/artist John Cage with Carl Sumsion are on loan from the Robert W. Woodruff Library at Emory University. Prints by Joan Miró, Marc Chagall, and others in the OUMA permanent collection will also be on view. These 1960s and ’70s works are a powerful representation of the Modernist, Surrealist, Abstract Expressionist movements in the U.S. and abroad. They also touch on the Color Field, Dada, and Kinetic art movements.

Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) The Prince of Love (The Hanged Man)

Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) The Prince of Love (The Hanged Man)

SALVADOR DALI: Trilogy of Love features a selection of large format lithographs by Salvador Dalí (1904-1989), including those in his Trilogy of Love series and his Retrospective Suite. Never one to embrace convention, this Spanish born giant of the Surrealist movement broke with fine print tradition producing hundreds of signed editions of his work. These prints are part of the OUMA permanent collection.

Kimo Minton (1950) Speak Riddles to Me

Kimo Minton (1950)
Speak Riddles to Me

KIMO MINTON: Jazz Abstractions presents a selection of color woodcuts, mixed media work, and sculpture by contemporary artist Kimo Minton (born 1950), courtesy of Atlanta’s TEW Galleries and the artist. Minton, whose work has been compared to that of American artist Stuart Davis (1892-1964) is pleased to embrace musical aesthetic viewers ascribe to his work. His free standing sculptures and bas relief wall pieces also bring to mind the work of one of the earliest Abstract artists Russian/French Wassily Kandinsky (1866-1944).

Oglethorpe University Museum of Art is open Tuesday-Sunday, 12 noon to 5 p.m. and closed Mondays and university holidays. General admission is $5. OUMA members and children under 12 receive free admission. Parking is free. OUMA is located on the third floor of Lowry Hall.

OUMA is supported by the Georgia Council for the Arts and is a proud member of Blue Star Museums, offering free admission to members of the military and their families from Memorial Day through Labor Day. OUMA is a member of the Southeastern Museums Conference, the American Alliance of Museums, and the Association of Academic Museums and Galleries. For more information, visit museum.oglethorpe.edu or call 404-364-8555.

Petrel Named Georgia National Guard Non-Commissioned Officer of the Year

Eric Hunt 3

State Command Sergeant Major Stringfield, Oglethorpe junior Staff Sgt. Eric Hunt, and State Commanding General Jarrard.

The Army National Guardsmen annually holds a Non-Commissioned Officer competition that is comprised of multiple levels of various grueling tasks, both physical and mental.  This year, Oglethorpe junior and Stone Mountain, Ga. native Staff Sgt. Eric N. Hunt ’16, an infantryman with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 121st Infantry Regiment, 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, won the competition and was named Georgia National Guard Non-Commissioned Officer of the Year. Eric, an international studies major, has spent approximately five years in the Army and three years in the National Guard.

In order to compete for the NCO recipient for the state level, Eric endured several levels of competition. The first level is the Battalion, which is held for one day in January. Competitors who are successful in the first level move on to the Brigade level, which occurs for three days in February. Finally, the state NCO candidates are put through a four-day competition in March.

Competitors are put through multiple types of physical and mental tests. First, is the fitness test, which includes push-ups, sit-ups and a two-mile run. An exam with general military topics and a graded essay is then administered. Weapons qualification follows, along with an obstacle course, and an interview with the merit board. The final task includes demonstrating general army skills, with no rest in-between.

Eric Hunt 4Eric says he preferred the shooting, weapons maintenance, and land navigation aspects of the competition. However, thanks to his Oglethorpe education, he felt he was best prepared for the essay and interview.

Eric advises other students to make time to work toward your goals. “There is a lot that can get done if you make time for things,” he says. “If there is something you want, go for it.”

Staff and Faculty Honored at Employee Recognition Luncheon

Award winners Mark Gross, Jon Akin, Renee Vary Keele, Danny Glassmann, George Kopec and Melissa Briley.

Award winners Mark Gross, Jon Akin, Renee Vary Keele, Danny Glassmann, George Kopec and Melissa Briley.

The second annual Employee Recognition Luncheon was held this week and a number of staff and faculty members were recognized for their exceptional service to Oglethorpe.

Oglethorpe staff members were invited to nominate their peers for six awards that recognized individuals who have gone “beyond the call of duty.” All awards included a monetary prize.

The Staff Member of the Year Award for the 2013-14 academic year went to Renee Vary Keele, director of University Communications. Her award was presented by co-worker and nominator J. Todd Bennett, executive director of University Communications, who spoke of her revitalization of the university’s Carillon magazine and media relations efforts, which both garnered several national awards over the past year, among other accomplishments. “As the university’s editor-in-chief,” Todd said, “she has improved or created tools to tell the Oglethorpe story including the OU Stories, OU Newswire, and the Carillon. Renee’s taken on the work of arts promotion, including all marketing and promotion for the museum. She supports practically every office and department on campus, and does it exceedingly well.”

Additional awards were presented to staff members who exhibited exemplary conduct during the past year in specific categories. The winners of these awards are:
Customer Service Award: George Kopec, Director of Development Services
Professionalism Award: Danny Glassmann, Assistant Dean of Students and Director of Residence Life
Quality Award: Mark Gross, Assistant Director of the Academic Success Center
Teamwork Award: Jon Akin, Head Soccer Coach
Creativity Award: Melissa Briley, Accounts Receivable Manager

The Staff Recognition Committee was responsible for reviewing and evaluating all of the nominations to determine the winners. This year’s committee was comprised of last year’s award winners Laura Masce, Suzy Lane, Judy Zahn and Katie Paden.

Additionally, pins were presented to employees who celebrated notable work anniversaries at Oglethorpe. Celebrating 5 years of service were Lesley Cole, Leah Zinner, Devon Belcher, Suzy Lane and David Dixon. Celebrating 10 years of service were Daniel Adams, Peter Howell, Kendra King, Lynn Guhde, Roarke Donnelly, Anne Salter and George Kopec. Celebrating 15 years of service were Nick Maher and John Carton. Jeffrey Collins celebrated 20 years and Alan Loehle, Jay Lutz and Barb Henry all celebrated 25 years. John Orme and Monte Wolf celebrated 30 and 35 years, respectively.

Congratulations to all of this year’s honorees, and thank you to everyone who dedicates their professional lives to benefit Oglethorpe University!

“In Love with the World”: Study Abroad in France

51Geneva3

Shea Pitre ’15 at the United Nations headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland

Before I began my study abroad at L’Université Catholique de Lille, I had never been out of the country and had rarely ventured out of the southern U.S. I’m an International Studies and French double major, so studying in France was a necessity, but the decision to do it for a year was both insanely easy and incredibly frightening. I was worried about all the usual things students worry about before they begin their study abroad. Would I like it? How was I going to handle being so far away from home for so long? Did I know enough French to actually live in France?

Not long after my arrival in France, all of my worries were put to rest. The first few months were not without their fair share of struggles and homesickness, but I quickly fell in love with my surroundings. Being constantly surrounded by the French language and culture was, and still is, absolutely thrilling. I am constantly learning new things in and out of the classroom, not only about the world around me but also about myself.

London

London!

In the classroom, I have been able to attain a higher level of French. I have also been able to gain a different perspective on international relations and what is going on in the world. Most of my classes this year have focused on international political ties and foreign policy from a French and broader European view, and it has truly enriched what I already knew and loved about my International Studies major.

My time abroad so far has been a truly transformative experience. Thanks to Europe’s connectedness, I’ve now been to 24 cities in 13 different countries, and I have learned so much in each place from experiencing it, rather than reading it out of a textbook. Besides finally realizing my childhood dream of going to Paris (which was amazing), one of the most exciting experiences I’ve had during my exchange was visiting the Palace of Nations and the United Nations headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. It was so wonderful to learn its history and be in a place where so many important decisions have been made on the international front.

Lille

Lille, France

Thanks to all of these amazing experiences that I have had and the fact that I have been submersed in a completely different culture for seven months, I am more confident and inspired, and I have fallen in love with the world. However, as amazing as this experience has been, I am ready to return home to see where everything I have learned leads me in life and in the rest of my time at Oglethorpe. I urge every Oglethorpe student to talk to Dr. Collins and take advantage of one of the many amazing study abroad opportunities our school has to offer. You won’t regret it.