Porsche Care Network Awards Grants to Three Student Groups

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Oglethorpe has a long-standing relationship with Porsche. Eight alumni currently work at luxury car company—a number of whom started as interns.

Congratulations to three Oglethorpe student groups who came in first with Porsche!
In 2015, three Oglethorpe student organizations were awarded a total of $1500 (of the $5,000 available) from the Porsche Care Network, the community service organization of Porsche Cars North America, headquartered in Atlanta.  Environmentally Conscious Oglethorpe Students (ECOS), Heifer International, and the Outdoors Club, each received $500 to support their initiatives after submitting an application essay describing their organization’s goals, and how the donation would be used.

Each year, the Environmental Committee of Porsche Care Network helps to promote and support organizations devoted to the environment and sustainability. As part of this, student groups at various Georgia colleges and universities are identified and rewarded for their efforts with a chance to compete for a donation.

All three organizations provide an opportunities for Oglethorpe students who are concerned about our earth to make a difference. ECOS shares weekly tips and tricks for students, organizes a Greek Row clean up, and volunteered with Trees Atlanta. The Outdoors Club frequently hosts Atlanta-area excursions for members, with events ranging from hiking at Tallulah Falls to rock climbing at Stone Summit Climbing and Fitness Center. The Heifer International club hosted a International Food Fair to raise donations to help buy honeybees and a “flock of hope” (chicks, ducks, and goslings).

ECOS will use the grant to create an off-campus compost plan for leftover food in the dining hall. The Outdoors Club used their grant to plan a day trip for 15 students to Appalachian Ski Mountain. Heifer International plans to use its grant to help increase awareness about the club on campus and to support a women’s empowerment event.

Read more about the connections between Oglethorpe and Porsche!

Seniors Headline Museum Lectures on Politics & Physics

Two Oglethorpe students had the opportunity to deliver public lectures within their fields of study, as part of the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art’s spring exhibitions “Azadi va Edalat: Stories Retold by Contemporary Iranian Women Artists” and “Time is an Illusion: Revisiting Einstein’s Theory of Relativity,” showcasing an original handwritten Einstein manuscript owned by the university.

Ruwa Romman ’15 and Antonio Màntica ’15 were selected by Elizabeth Peterson , OUMA’s director, to speak about the exhibits and share their academic and personal expertise on the subject matters.

In her lecture, “Liberated, not oppressed: A different perspective on Muslim women,” Ruwa, a politics major, spoke of women’s liberation on a global scale. “Women being oppressed is not exclusive to the Muslim faith,” she said. “In fact, Islam liberated women by giving them the right to inherit, choose who they marry, work, etc. The issue is that people misuse ideologies for what they want. It’s not the faith, it’s the people. I view my faith as a liberating thing, including my head scarf.”  Ruwa’s perspectives are grounded in her Muslim faith, multiple leadership roles on campus (including president of the Student Government Association and founding member of COEXIST), and her recent internship at the National Center for Civil and Human Rights in Atlanta.

 

Antonio, a physics major active in theatre, presented the lecture “A Tour Through Time,” which also was a featured event in the city-wide Atlanta Science Festival. Antonio walked his audience through the history of various cultures’ perceptions of time—highlighting specific cultures and points in history that contributed to our current understanding of time. He also illustrated our modern conception of how time passes and what it means to measure it, and explored what we do not understand about it. “Einstein revolutionized how we picture time,” said Antonio, “and my lecture aimed to describe the history and the concepts of his ideas to the audience.”

“Only at Oglethorpe could a student have an experience like this,” said Antonio, who was excited to have the chance to speak about his hero Einstein. “Before the lecture, Elizabeth Peterson said to me: ‘I love working at a place where this is possible.’  At Oglethorpe, students have these amazing opportunities to present academic studies in a professional setting, and that is invaluable.”

 

Oglethorpe Filmmakers to Compete for $10,000 National Prize

A team of Oglethorpe University student filmmakers has been selected to advance to the final round of the Campus Movie Fest (CMF) Fan Choice Award, presented by Western Digital. The team will be among a group of the best student-created films nationwide, competing for a chance to win $10,000.

The team accepts their CMF award at the Oglethorpe University Red Carpet premiere event

The team accepts their CMF award at the Oglethorpe University Red Carpet premiere event

Nearly 500 movies from 11 colleges were in competition within the southeastern group, with only five movies selected to advance to the final round of national competition. Also advancing from Oglethorpe’s district are University of Central Florida, University of South Florida, and The University of Tampa.

Oglethorpe’s winning team, originally named The Ugly Sweater and The Onsies, and recently renamed Nine Cents Broke, include: Amanda Turner ’17, Sonny Pimentel ’16, Elizabeth Kirkwoork ’18, and Audrey Stradler ’18, all of whom are studying studio art, photography, and video/film, as well as Jack Bishop ’17 and Amanda Ake ’17, both English majors, and Miranda Lotufo ’18, Victoria Lindbergh ’17, and Kieran Flake ’17, all theatre majors.

Amanda Turner, editor and spokesperson for the group, was overwhelmed at the honor of being selected, saying, “it’s pretty amazing to suddenly win something as big as Campus Movie Fest. I don’t think any of us knew how we were going to do or what we were up against. I think a few us were crying with joy.”

Members of the team will be making the trip to Los Angeles, Calif. in June where their movie “[fixed.echoes]” will be shown along with 19 other top voted films from three other voting groups across the country, in competition for the $10,000 price.

Good luck, Team Nine Cents Broke!

 

 

The Art of Living and Learning

Holly Bostick ’15 sat on the porch of her small cabin drinking a cup of coffee, watching toucans fly before the most breathtaking sunrise she’d ever seen. There was no electricity, air conditioning, or hot water—just a small wooden cot where she slept. And somehow, that was more than enough.

An art history major and Spanish minor, Holly was among a small group of volunteers who traveled to Belize this past summer to assist in archeological excavations at the Maya ruins. She pursued this “life-changing” experience after another—an Oglethorpe-sponsored short-term trip to Greece in 20Belize archeological dig 213. As part of her studies on ancient art and architecture, Holly had visited an active archaeological dig in Corinth and was captivated. She wanted to find a way to relive that experience.

Holly researched similar programs and discovered the Maya Research Program, a nonprofit that sponsors archaeological and ethnographic research in Central America. Holly and approximately 35 other volunteers, including fellow OU student and art history major Emily Prichard ’15, trekked to Blue Creek, Belize, where they joined archaeological digs. Each morning, they jumped into the back of pickups and navigated to the excavation sites—usually Xno’ha, an “elite residential complex” discovered in 2013. There, they were “hands on,” organizing remains and piecing together skeletons. Having no experience in anatomy or anthropology, Holly admits she had a bit of a learning curve, but that it was “absolutely incredible and a one-of-a-kind experience.”

Back in the U.S., Holly was determined to continue her journey. Oglethorpe art professors Alan Loehle and Dr. Jeffrey Collins recommended that she apply for an internship at The Carter Center, which holds an extensive art collection. Given the competitiveness of any opportunity at Center, Holly felt honored to be selected for the art internship, and credits her academic and global experiences for setting her apart from other applicants. Holly has gained insight into museum operations and experience with fine art, a compliment to her work with artifacts.

“The Carter Center’s art collection is very eclectic, with no specific genre,” Holly said. “Many of the items are donations from countries around the world in thanks for the Carter Center’s worldwide efforts in peace. So, a general knowledge in many different art mediums and cultures was crucial for the internship.”

Holly graduates in 2015, and while she’s yet undecided about her career path, she knows her options are endless, crediting her ventures while at Oglethorpe.

“When I would tell people where I was going and what I was doing, they would always give me a look and ask ‘why?’. My response, of course, being ‘why not?’” she said, laughing. “[My experiences] broadened my sense of the world, and my personal world, specifically. It showed me that there aren’t limitations and I don’t have to settle for any one career. I have options and places to explore and that is what I intend to do.”

Heather Johnston ’17 is a communication & rhetoric studies major, with a minor in business administration. She is currently an intern for Pegasus Creative, the student communications agency in the University Communications department, and writes for the Stormy Petrel student newspaper.