OU Museum of Art Now Hosting Three New Exhibitions

Fernand Léger: Fétes de la faim or Feast of Hunger lithograph on display in the Oglethorpe Museum of Art

Fernand Léger: Fétes de la faim or Feast of Hunger lithograph on display in the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art

Life-long learners, students and art lovers should be sure to check out the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art’s three new exhibitions, now on view through December 8, 2013:

The 20th Century Modern Masters exhibition features more than 80 works by three of the 20th century’s modernist leaders. The lithographs, etchings and aquatints on display were inspired by collaborations or interpretations of major literary works by post WWII writers and poets. Each work on display introduces visitors to rhythmic beauty in function and form and gives insight into the artist’s thought process concerning life and literature.

hugo13

An artist’s rendition of Victor Hugo.

The French political activist Victor Hugo is best known for his books Les Miserables and Notre Dame de Paris (The Hunchback of Notre Dame). His literature and discourse has since inspired many an artist to celebrate the life and abilities of this literary master. This exhibition is on display in the Center Gallery and features drawings, prints and sculptures by a variety of artists.Most notable among these artists are Jean-François Raffaëlli and Frederick Hendrik Kaemmerer, who were both students of Jean-Léon Gerôme.

Christmas comes early this year at OUMA with Haddon Sundblom’s Santa Paintings. Sundblom is responsible for the quintessential look of The Coca-Cola Company‘s seasonal Santa style, inspired by Clement Clarke Moore 1822 poem, “A Visit from St. Nicholas“. His paintings of the jolly and plump Santa we know today were created between the 1930s and 1950s. Sundblom also is known for creating the “Quaker Man” for Quaker Oats and did work for Maxwell House, Colgate, Palmolive and Nabisco.

The Coca-Cola Company presents Haddon Sundblom's art.

Haddon Sundblom’s Santa, now on exhibit courtesy of The Coca-Cola Company.

A Wednesday Lecture Series also accompanies the exhibitions:

  • September 25, 7 p.m. “’Crommelynck’s Le Cocu Magnifique (The Magnificent Cuckold)’ illustrated by Picasso and Robert Andrew Parker,” by Dr. Jay Lutz, Professor of French, Oglethorpe University
  • October 2, 7 p.m. “Victor Hugo and French Romanticism” by Mr. John Daniel Tilford, Collections Manager, OU Museum of Art.
  • October 16, 7 p.m. “Léger, Le Corbusier, Italian Futurists, Machines, and the Dynamic City” by Dr. Jeffrey Collins, Assistant Professor of Art History, Oglethorpe University.
  • November 6, 7 p.m. “Léger’s Modernist Take on Rimbaud’s Illuminations” by Dr. Jay Lutz, Professor of French, Oglethorpe University.
  • November 20, 7 p.m. “Georges Braque Paintings and Prints” by Ms. Renée Maurer, Assistant Curator, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.
  • December 4, 7 p.m. “Keeping Christmas: From Pagan to Puritan to Popular Culture” by Ms. Elizabeth Peterson, Director, OU Museum of Art.

View the first lecture,”The Right and Left Bank of Parisian Artists: The Bateau Lavoir and the Ruche,” by OU Professor of French Jay Lutz:

The Oglethorpe University Museum of Art is open Tuesday-Sunday, 12 noon to 5 p.m. and closed Mondays and university holidays. General admission is $5; free admission for OUMA members, children under 12 and with a Petrel Pass. For more information, visit museum.oglethorpe.edu or call 404-364-8555.

Camp Flix Rolls Out the Red Carpet at Oglethorpe

Camp Flix2

Credit: Camp Flix

A one-of-a-kind in the Southeast, Camp Flix offers 11 to 17-year-olds the opportunity to learn more about the worlds of acting and filmmaking. This one-week premier movie camp, hosted on the Oglethorpe campus, is a stepping stone for young minds interested in dabbling in production or enhancing their skills and talents.

Led by a group of industry professionals (many of whom have worked for big names like Turner Broadcasting, ESPN, MTV, HBO, CBS and many more), campers were given personal instruction from their first shoot to the red carpet finale. During their week on campus, campers endured a rigorous yet rewarding schedule that catered to all types of careers in the movie business. Lessons were taught about how to act on camera, while techniques were shared about how to be a good director, editor and cinematographer.

Credit: Camp Flix

Credit: Camp Flix

Participants worked together in small film crews as they created one-of-a-kind short films. All around campus, students were actively piecing together the information they were taught as they brainstormed, filmed and edited throughout the week.

As a special treat, master classes were held on the final day by some heavy hitters in the film making industry. John Rauh, a visual effects expert and professor at SCAD Atlanta, broke down the fundamentals of visual effects seen in award-winning films such as Inception and The Avengers. Scot Safon ,vice president of CNN Worldwide/HLN (Headline News), demonstrated the purposes of marketing and entertainment intelligence—important aspects of the movie industry.

Students enjoying the red carpet

Students strike a pose at the red carpet event at Lupton Hall.

By the end of session, students had gained well-rounded knowledge about acting for the camera, pre-production, production and post-production. Campers happily showcased their accomplishments at their red carpet premiere.

Visit Campflix online to view the short films from current and past sessions.

 

OU Students Play a Part in Georgia Shakespeare’s “Metamorphoses”

Kristin Butler '14 performing in Metamorphoses

Kristin Butler ’14 performing in “Metamorphoses”

Oglethorpe University theater students have the exceedingly rare opportunity to be a part of theater at the professional level—right on their own campus. As part of the decades-long partnership between Georgia Shakespeare and Oglethorpe, students are invited to compete for scholarships that provide not only financial assistance, but also the privilege of interning with the company during their junior year.

This summer, Georgia Shakespeare scholar Kristin Butler ’14 is taking full advantage of her internship. Butler captured a role in the production of Metamorphoses and credits her scholarship from Oglethorpe as the stepping stone for getting this rare opportunity.

“I don’t see how I would have had this opportunity without the scholarship,” said Kristin. “I feel prepared after having these experiences.”

Working with past Georgia Shakespeare scholars and her fellow OU thespians has shown Kristin that the Georgia Shakespeare experience is just as much the Oglethorpe experience. She says it’s exciting “to see people in an academic environment, and then see how they take the same education I have, and see how they act in a professional environment.”

metamorphoses_georgia shakespeareNot only are Georgia Shakespeare scholars active and involved, but several other Oglethorpe thespians are taking part in the summer fun, too. Antonio Mantica ’15, Laura Roberts ’15 and Lilly Romestant ’14 aren’t right in the spotlight this time, but they’re still bringing their talents to “Georgia Shakes”. Lilly is perfecting her assistant directing skills, while Antonio and Laura run the front-of-house operations.

Take the time to go see our students in action by catching Metamorphoses at the Conant Performing Arts Center, but move quickly—the run ends this Sunday, July 21!

OU Hosts Atlanta Chamber Music Festival

OU's Dr. Runnels Leads a Trio

OU’s Dr. Brent Runnels leads a trio.

The Atlanta Chamber Music Festival is a three-day seminar for middle and high school musicians—and this year, Oglethorpe is hosting the event!

This intensive workshop allows budding musicians musicians to hone their craft with the help and coaching of renowned professional musicians from the Atlanta area, including OU artist-in-residence Dr. Brent Runnels. Students have the opportunity to play together in chamber and orchestral ensembles and to perform with more advanced musicians.ACMF 032 The faculty also perform in a chamber recital open to all students. And, the the grand finale is a student recital on Saturday evening, followed by a reception for all.

Founders Katie Holland, Jonathan Wright, and Jessica Sherer founded the program after they noticed a lack of education for young musicians interested in chamber music selections, especially outside of the classroom. The music festival strives to encourage and educate students who have a passion for chamber music or simply want to diversify their skill set.

Young violinists at work

Young violinists at work

Eager to share their love and knowledge of music, students get a glimpse into the daily life of a working musician. Participants are taught pieces of music, given little time to rehearse, and then showcase their hard work in front of a live audience.  These pressures and time constraints provide a real-life experience for the students as well as a “testing of the waters” of their possible future profession.

Only in its second year of existence, the festival is making major strides in the lives of young and promising musicians. We are excited to support and to be a part of the festival’s promising beginnings!